Affordable Iconic Cars: Audi A8 V8 Quattro

I was more a fan of Lock, Stock, Snatch and Bank Job than I was of Transporter. I liked my cockney’s cheeky not suave. And certainly not muscles from Brussels, or in this case, lusty from London. But then I was introduced to Transporter 2 and forgetting all the flexing and martial arts, the car chases and sense of speed finally won me over.

audi a8 w12

Jason Statham, for those uninitiated, played Frank Martin, a driver extraordinaire who delivered some exceedingly dodgy parcels without asking any questions. He had three rules; never change the deal, no names and never open the package. I quite enjoyed the flick, I certainly liked his pad in the South of France but I loved his car, a 2005 Audi A8L W-12. Six litres and  a whopping 444 bhp (331 kW), the same engine found in the VW Phaeton and also in Bentley’s Continental, though in that guise it was given twin turbos. Nevertheless, it was able to propel a car weighing more than two tonnes from rest to 100 km/h in 5.1 seconds and on to 160 km/h in only 12.3.

After a little more digging, it appears that they used both the V8 and the W12 in the movie. Some people out there have noted that the W12 insignia found on the grill appears and disappears throughout the movie, depending on the driving style needed for a specific scene. I’ll take their geeky word for it, which is handy, because I can’t find a W12 from that era available for sale in Australia – the States yes and at very reasonable prices too, but not here.

audi a8 in black

However, there are plenty of V8 Quattro’s available and other than the grill art you’d be hard pressed to tell the difference.   Now, when new, you would have had to fork out almost $200k for this sublime, aluminium laden, four wheel driven machine. Add eight or nine years and a little over 110,000 kms and you can have one in your garage for just over $30k. Thirty bloody thousand!

Think about that for a moment. That’s more than $20k a year in depreciation, which is a terrible statistic if you’d bought new, but it’s marvellous for those of us prepared to wait. Added to that you’d have a better looking car too, compared to the new model available today.   The V8, second generation Audi A8, referred to as the D3, lost a second or so in the sprint to 100km/h compared to the W12 but who cares, 6 seconds is fast enough. This isn’t a WRX, you are not going to wake people up blasting away from the lights in the middle of the night, after blowers hissing away. No, you’re going to waft away cool as a cat, luxuriating in tactile leather, bathed in incredible Bose sound whilst practising your east London vernacular.

So now that I have tempted you, what should you know. Its timing belt has to be changed by 150,000 kms, preferably sooner. This is an Audi remember so anything major will be expensive, so prevention is always better than cure. Ensure that the coolant is red in colour, if not then the wrong mix has been added and who knows what could happen. It probably shows a lazy owner, so steer clear.   All engines leak a little but anything more than that spells danger, especially around the valve covers and head gasket.   Make sure there are no leaks around the power steering pump, steering rack or high pressure hydraulic lines at the bottom of the driver’s side of the engine too.   If you can get beneath the car, A8’s can leak oil at the final drive seal on the transmission and the seal may need to be replaced, which isn’t too expensive. But the seals around the rear differential may need replacing if you see oil splatter anywhere near it. This can be costly as the whole diff would need to come off to replace them.

If the CV boots are torn the whole axle needs to come off to replace them so that adds up.   If you have the chance to take it to a mechanic it would be worth checking the on-board computer fault codes for the engine, transmission and the heating and aircon system, or HVAC.   Inside apparently the heated steering wheel, yes that’s right a heated steering wheel, has a tendency to fail. Hardly an issue in Australia, but its worth noting. The electric headrests had similar problems too, so make sure they move. Press “down” first, just in case, otherwise they might be stuck in the highest position. The glove box too had problems, so ensure that opens and closes.

As always, ensure the car has been regularly serviced and presents with immaculate log books. It may seem ridiculous to spend so much money on a new A8 and not maintain it, but as my old man used to say, assume other drivers are idiots and you’ll probably be the better for it. Dad never had that many friends as you might imagine, but it’s proven to be useful advice on a few occasions nonetheless.

Audi-A8
Courtesy of www.supercars.org

One Reply to “Affordable Iconic Cars: Audi A8 V8 Quattro”

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