Interesting night at the auction. Not only did the Quattro, mentioned here on this site, not sell for a decent price tag, it was passed in at $17k (I fear its poor re-spray may have let it down), some people in Sydney are prepared to pay $50k + for a Mk 1 TVR Tuscan; a car that is both beautiful and flawed, fast and unreliable, from a company now defunct, ruined by some junior Russian oligarch after five decades of steady progress from a small factory in Blackpool, northern England. Parts will be almost non-existent, and a lathe and a workshop a necessity.

By: The Car Spy

Yet the $50k bid was turned down because it seems there are even more outlandish people out there and greedy ones at that. However, after the car was passed in someone did stump up the extra reddies and drove away in a whopping $58,500 trouble bucket. I would never have seen that coming and it’s probably why I am still only able to buy second-hand.

I didn’t quite hear the spiel in detail but there seemed a tenuous link with the film Swordfish. Would that make me want to pay $20-25k over the odds for a car that most probably won’t work next week, even if Halle Berry could have draped her shapely frame all over it? No thanks, but I did hesitate.

All this being said, I have to ask myself whether I am missing something. Are TVR’s becoming collectors’ items? Prices overseas suggest not, you can pick up a number in the UK for around £20k ($30k) so unless our buyer knows something the rest of us don’t, the words more money and sense spring to mind.

Would I like to drive it though? Oh yes please. To feel that enormous shove up to 100 kph and far beyond, in under 4 seconds, from a car that that cost a fraction of the price of anything else that could do that? Double please. This version is a 2003 model, with upgraded power to 400 bhp (298kW). There used to be a fantastic race series in the UK called the Tuscan Challenge, and it may still be running, and in race form speeds of over 190 mph were attained with acceleration figures to 100 mph in under 7 seconds. Now that’s fast.

By: Brian Snelson

If you are the new owner, check out the Research category for common problems http://wp.me/s3rCxt-763 and visit the links to the enthusiast forums.

No doubt you already know what you have bought and would have done the research. Wonderful car, fantastic noise and incredible performance, but what a shame if it just sits in a garage somewhere never to be driven.

The highest price on the night went to a beautifull ’59 Mercedes 190SL Roadster for $91k, closely followed by a mint condition ’64 230SL for $89k. A magnificent V12 E-Type sold for $56k completing the last podium spot.

Looking forward to what tasty treats lay in store for the next one.

Published by Mike Hollobon

I am a self proclaimed car fanatic, an avid driver and certainly more than a little anal when it comes to maintenance. I collect car magazines and cherish them like first editions. I've become a 'show me a tail light and I'll tell you the model' bore. I can spend hours discussing the merits of the latest sports car, people mover, SUV or city car. I am the guy who looks out of the window at the cars in the car park rather than the legs of the new office administrator. I love cars. But hitherto now I've not been able to afford the ones I’d really like, unless I turn to the pre-owned pages.

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  1. I had a TVR in Gran Turismo, couldn’t keep it on the road. I’m suprised Gene Hunt didn’t put his hand up for the Quattro, great car.