Porsche Boxster 987

A Porsche Boxster over a Honda S2000? Who’d have thought

This post was supposed to be about the Honda S2000, a good-looking two-seater that I thought would be easily within reach now that the better examples are some 8 to 10 years old. Well put together with Honda’s track record for reliability still intact, it certainly appealed to my sensibilities. It wasn’t as good as Merc’s SLK nor Porsche’s Boxster, but then it wasn’t as expensive, about half the price in the case of the Porsche.

Originally priced around AUD$73k, Red Book suggests an S2000 from 2008 should be between $20-28k. So I was somewhat surprised to find only two 2008 examples offered for sale at an eye watering $49k and $54k respectively. Not only was this twice what I was expecting, but I could get hold of a similar mileage Boxster for less. Either I am missing something and this is a car to keep, or there are some pretty greedy sellers out there. Supply and demand I guess. Nonetheless, bugger the Honda, I’ll go for the Porsche thank you.

Yes, I know all the car mags suggest that you buy a Porsche Boxster only because you can’t afford a 911, and no doubt that is true. The benefit, however, of the Boxster’s flat six mid-engine layout means there’s no surprises for the driver when you push it that bit too far, or when you take your foot off the pedal mid-corner. Something most 911 drivers will know about, and at my age, one less risk.

The 987, available from 2005-2012, was more powerful than the first model, with increased capacity to 2.7 litres and 176 kW in the standard car. The S had to wait a couple of years before its power plant increased to 3.4 litres, pumping out a very useful 216 kW.  In 2009, Porsche upgraded it again, beefing up the engine to 2.9 litres, and 3.5 litres in the S. This meant the 0-100 dash could now be reached in a mere 5.9 seconds in the standard manual, whilst the S dispatched it in only 5.3 seconds.

Interestingly, 2009 was the year that electronic gear changes finally broke the back of the 6 speed manual with the introduction of the new PDK transmission. A far better system than Porsche’s old Tiptronic option, the 7 speed double clutch box eclipsed its stick shift rival to 100 km/h by a fraction of a second only, but it was enough for most buyers to begin to ditch the manual. As you’d expect, power increased too, up to 188 kW for the standard car, and 228 kW for the S.

Courtesy of en.tugbit.com
Courtesy of en.tugbit.com

So, are you buying a villain or a hero? Well, by most accounts, the Boxster has proven exceptionally reliable. Data out of the UK suggest that MOT passes, their equivalent to the Aussie pink slip, stand at 82% for early 2005 examples and a brilliant 91% for cars built in 2010.

It seems that you are also better off looking for a higher mileage options. Boxsters prefer to be used regularly, otherwise can suffer oil leaks, failed batteries and corroded brakes. On the outside, they are very well-built as you’d expect but if you notice any blemishes, take it as a sign it has not been looked after and it will most probably run more than just skin deep.

Ensure that the car has been maintained by a qualified Porsche technician, as they do require a reasonable level of expertise. So factor this in to your considerations, both for the future and over its history. It’s more expensive but likely worth it.

Porsche Boxster S
Courtesy of freefoto.com

So let’s take a look around.

First up the roof.  It should work smoothly, but broken push rods can be a common problem. They are not too pricey to replace, certainly not if you go for an after-market option, but it’s a pain nonetheless. If you see any water damage around the base inside the car, be aware that a leak may have reached the ECU, and this will not be cheap if it needs replacing. Whilst you are at it, ensure all the lights and indicators are working too, as they seem to be the most common vehicle check failures.

Check the cooling vents and ducts at the front of the car as they often get overlooked and can collect a lot of gunk. If not checked and cleaned out regularly, the airways can get blocked and you’re left staring at a bill to replace the radiator.

The transmission is generally very reliable, but you’ll know there is a problem if the gear change and clutch is stiff in the manual, or you hear a humming or clicking sound coming from the rear in the auto models.

Porsche Boxsters do seem to chew up its coil springs though, so listen out for any suspension knocks and check that the car looks nice and level.

More expensive issues can be an RMS (Rear Main Seal) failure – an oil leak from the gearbox which, in itself, isn’t too much of an issue but it requires the box to be removed in order to repair it. A potentially more damaging issue is an IMS (Intermediate Shaft) bearing failure which can kill the engine if left unchecked. Luckily, this seems to be more of a Cayman issue, with only a few early 987’s affected. Subsequently, Porsche remedied the problem in 2006 by moving the bearing inside the crank case and this has proven a far stronger set up.

So what do owners consider the costliest aspect of enjoying this car?

Maintenance by a qualified Porsche technician, the cost of decent tyres and ancillaries such as the water pump bearings or an IMS upgrade.

Most forums suggest that, if maintained regularly, a Boxster is a very friendly daily drive. If you budget AUD$2000 – 3000 per year for maintenance you should be enjoying open top driving for a long time to come.

More Information & Forums:

Revolution Porsche in the UK goes in to more detail should you need it.

Cost of Ownership of a Boxster S

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Range Rover Evoque SD4

range rover evoque

A little something for the weekend, Madam

It would not be hard to fathom that I like Land Rovers. I own one and weep constantly at the bills that arrive whenever the word “service” enters the fray. They are both excellent and extravagant, particularly if you live in a city and rarely take it into the rough stuff.

But I have never bought into the baby Range Rover, the Range Rover Evoque. I’m not sure why? It looks unique enough, it has been well put together and, as James May discovered, even the two-wheel drive version can handle some pretty slippery slopes. But it’s a car for the DINK’s of Paddington, hipster types who quaff wheat grass and order soy decaf mocca frappacinos, and spend as much time on their hair as some of us do in the garage. Hardly any of the cars will see a muddy lane, let alone a remote track visited only by an indigenous elder. So it’s surprising to note that Orson, my friend and current owner of this Evoque SD4 Pure Tech, has two children, no dress sense, unless you regard black t-shirts fashionable, lives in the Hills district and has no hair at all.

Why would an apparently sane – no scratch that, he does have a penchant for pinball machines, 1970’s US muscle cars and Japanese people movers – a slightly insane then, successful, driven young father choose to spend $70,000 on a car that does nothing for his image? Answer: His wife liked it.

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Up close and personal, I can see why. Its lines are eye-catching, particularly dressed in pearlescent white with black roof. Its 18 inch wheels fill the arches aggressively and it does have that chic touch about it, that posh image that only a Range Rover can portray. People will invite you to their club for the weekend, organise pony trials with your daughter and make you the golf club captain. You don’t get the same reaction if you tell someone you’ve a Toyota, a Volkswagen, even a BMW. No, only a Rangey can do that.

But is it? Is it really a Rangey?

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Well yes, in many ways it is. It is very comfortable. It has five seats, all be it quite small ones. It can drive almost anywhere, and it is expensive. Even more so if you buy it new. After 3 years of trouble-free motoring however, this 27,600 kilometre example will save you almost $20,000 off list price, just about enough to get that horse-box your youngest will be needing.

For a car that weighs 30kg short of 1700, its punchy little 2.2 litre turbo diesel engine, the smallest in the diesel range, produces a reasonable 110kW (nearly 150 bhp) and gets you up to licence loss territory quicker than you think. Thanks in part to the weight saving properties of its aluminium bonnet and roof, its composite plastic tailgate, and its 6 speed auto box that becomes more responsive still when you use the paddle shifts behind the steering wheel.

Out on the mean streets of the Hills, I find I’m taking corners sharply and speed humps with aplomb. It is certainly a nippy little thing, but the engine note could be a bit more, what’s the word? Manly?

Switch on the sound system, and Orson’s choice of head nodding hip hop accost your ears like a low flying jet plane coming into land, and in the dark, the mood lighting adds a touch of bling to the atmosphere.

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The plastic fascia looks good but to touch it feels a tad low rent, akin to the disappointment of thinking you’ve bought leather shoes only to find out they are made of PVC. At this price a bit of Alcantara wouldn’t go amiss. The rest of the Tech options are nice to play with though, as is the All-Terrain system, a system I am used to in my Discovery. Though I may scoff at its off-road pedigree, it does have class leading ground clearance and with its decent approach and departure angles, this thing will probably follow my Disco with ease.

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So what’s wrong with them? Well after first appearing in 2011, there was a spate of software glitches and the odd one had poor build quality. But in the main, they have been well received by buyers. Orson tells me he has not had any issues with his, he’s not even had to replace the tyres.

So would I buy one? Errrm …. Probably not. But then I have four kids.

So who would? Well that bit is obvious. It was not voted 2012 Women’s Overall World Car of The Year and Women’s Top World Luxury Car of the Year for nothing. Your wife will.

Orson’s Evoque is available for sale on CarSales by clicking the following link:

http://www.carsales.com.au/private/details/Land-Rover-Range-Rover-Evoque-2012/SSE-AD-3684470

 

Range Rover Evoque